Watershed

In the Middle East, 5% of the worlds population shares 0.9% of the worlds water resources. Increasingly affected by development and population growth, per capita water availability has become the world’s worst. Conflict zones have arisen across the region and ground water supplies across the Arabian Peninsula are being depleted faster then they are being replenished. This crisis will affect millions of lives across the Middle East. These are the stories of some of those living on the forefront of this transition.

hands funnel water into a chute as it spills over the edge of the falaj in misfat oman
boys swim in a cistern formed by the falaj that supplies water to Misfat, Oman.
Sulem al Abri washes in the falaj before praying in the mosque in Misfat Oman
Suleman al Abri has his grandson help dress him before going to mosque in Misfat Oman
A boy picks dates from his family's date palms in Misfat Oman
The Falaj carries water along the side of a cliff on its way to the village of Misfat, Oman
The town of Misfat, Oman, seen from the hillsides above. Date plams grow in the valley below
The Tigris River as seen from the caves of Hasankeyf, Turkey
a boy holds up a small fish he caught using a gill net in the Tigris River near Hasankey Turkey
Hasankey Turkey and the Tigris River
Mehmet Nuri Aydin weaves a carpet from will while his son watches and helps witht he shop in Hasankeyf Turkey
A shopkeeper walk through his store in Hasankeyf Turkey
A shopkeeper and his son lock the storefront at the end of the day in Hasankeyf Turkey
a tractor and a farmer in Palestine
Father and son stand together in a feild in Palestine as they work to lay irrigation pipes
The vinter at Kibbutz Sde Boker examins the grapes growing in the Negev Desert in Isreal
A groundskeeper adjusts a solar powered instrument used for regulating irrigation water
Groundskeeper ties back acacia tree on the grounds of kibbutz sde boker
hands funnel water into a chute as it spills over the edge of the falaj in misfat omanboys swim in a cistern formed by the falaj that supplies water to Misfat, Oman.Sulem al Abri washes in the falaj before praying in the mosque in Misfat OmanSuleman al Abri has his grandson help dress him before going to mosque in Misfat OmanA boy picks dates from his family's date palms in Misfat OmanThe Falaj carries water along the side of a cliff on its way to the village of Misfat, OmanThe town of Misfat, Oman, seen from the hillsides above. Date plams grow in the valley belowThe Tigris River as seen from the caves of Hasankeyf, Turkeya boy holds up a small fish he caught using a gill net in the Tigris River near Hasankey TurkeyHasankey Turkey and the Tigris RiverMehmet Nuri Aydin weaves a carpet from will while his son watches and helps witht he shop in Hasankeyf TurkeyA shopkeeper walk through his store in Hasankeyf TurkeyA shopkeeper and his son lock the storefront at the end of the day in Hasankeyf Turkeya tractor and a farmer in PalestineFather and son stand together in a feild in Palestine as they work to lay irrigation pipesThe vinter at Kibbutz Sde Boker examins the grapes growing in the Negev Desert in IsrealA groundskeeper adjusts a solar powered instrument used for regulating irrigation waterGroundskeeper ties back acacia tree on the grounds of kibbutz sde boker



For years Suleman Bin Nasser Bin Abdullah Al Abri has been the caretaker of the falaj, an ancient and complex system of canals that provide his village with water for irrigation and daily life.
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Ahemed Saeed, a farmer in al Jiftlik near the Jordan River, struggles each dry season when his well can no longer support crops to provide for himself and his family. Elisa Zurgil, an adviser to the Israeli Fruit Growers’ Association, keeps his kibbutz in the Negev Desert thriving using high-tech distribution methods and water from Tel Aviv.
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Mehmet Nouri Aydn makes his living in Hasankeyf, Turkey, a village first inhabited over 10,000 years ago, selling his hand woven carpets to tourists. But his livelihood and home will soon be submerged under the Tigris River when construction on a damn downstream is complete.
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